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usa-aid-to-isisl

U.S. Humanitarian Aid Going to Daesh-ISIL

Not only are foodstuffs, medical supplies—even clinics—going to ISIS, the distribution networks are paying ISIS ‘taxes’ and putting ISIS people on their payrolls.

GAZIANTEP, Turkey—While U.S. warplanes strike at the militants of the so-called Islamic State in both Syria and Iraq, truckloads of U.S. and Western aid has been flowing into territory controlled by the jihadists, assisting them to build their terror-inspiring “caliphate.”

The aid—mainly food and medical equipment—is meant for Syrians displaced from their hometowns, and for hungry civilians. It is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, European donors, and the United Nations. Whether it continues is now the subject of anguished debate among officials in Washington and European. The fear is that stopping aid would hurt innocent civilians and would be used for propaganda purposes by the militants, who would likely blame the West for added hardship.

The Bible says if your enemy is hungry, feed him, and if he is thirsty, give him something to drink—doing so will “heap burning coals” of shame on his head. But there is no evidence that the militants of the Islamic State, widely known as ISIS or ISIL, feel any sense of disgrace or indignity (and certainly not gratitude) receiving charity from their foes.

Quite the reverse, the aid convoys have to pay off ISIS emirs (leaders) for the convoys to enter the eastern Syrian extremist strongholds of Raqqa and Deir ez-Zor, providing yet another income stream for ISIS militants, who are funding themselves from oil smuggling, extortion, and the sale of whatever they can loot, including rare antiquities from museums and archaeological sites.

“The convoys have to be approved by ISIS and you have to pay them: The bribes are disguised and itemized as transportation costs,” says an aid coordinator who spoke to The Daily Beast on the condition he not be identified in this article. The kickbacks are either paid by foreign or local nongovernmental organizations tasked with distributing the aid, or by the Turkish or Syrian transportation companies contracted to deliver it.

And there are fears the aid itself isn’t carefully monitored enough, with some sold off on the black market or used by ISIS to win hearts and minds by feeding its fighters and its subjects. At a minimum, the aid means ISIS doesn’t have to divert cash from its war budget to help feed the local population or the displaced persons, allowing it to focus its resources exclusively on fighters and war-making, say critics of the aid.

…read more at: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/10/19/u-s-humanitarian-aid-going-to-isis.html

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ISIS shows off weapons cache allegedly airdropped by US

Islamic State has published a new video in which a jihadist shows off brand-new American hardware, which was purportedly intended for the Kurds they are fighting in the Syrian border town of Kobani.

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Syrian Kurds accuse Turkey of refusing to transfer injured fighters to hospitals at border

With medical supplies depleted in the war-ravaged north Syrian town of Kobane, Kurdish activist Blesa Omar rushed three comrades wounded in battle against Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) straight to the border to dispatch them to a Turkish hospital.

He spent the next four hours watching them die, one by one, from what he believes were treatable shrapnel wounds, while Turkish border guards refused to let them through the frontier.

“To me it is clear they died because they waited so long. If they had received help, even up to one hour before their deaths, they could have lived,” said Omar, 34, an ethnic Kurd originally from Iraq who holds Swedish nationality.

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The mother of Syrian Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) militant Seydo Mehmud mourns above his grave on Oct. 11 in the Turkish town of Suruç. AFP Photo / Aris Messinis

“Once the soldiers realised they were dead, they said, ‘Now you can cross with the bodies.’ I cannot forget that. It was total chaos, it was a catastrophe,” he said, choking back tears.

Deaths of wounded fighters held up at the border have become another emotive charge in a litany of Kurdish grievances against Ankara, which Kurds accuse of turning its back on their kin fighting across the frontier against ISIL.

The anger has brought violence to Turkey itself: Turkey’s 15 million-strong Kurdish minority rose up last week in riots in which at least 35 people were killed. On Oct. 14, there were reports that Turkish war planes had bombed Kurdish militants for the first time in two years.

…read more at: http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/syrian-kurds-accuse-turkey-of-refusing-to-transfer-injured-fighters-to-hospitals-at-border.aspx?pageID=238&nID=72966&NewsCatID=352

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Injured Kurds smuggle themselves from Syria to Turkey for medical help

Turkey’s border remains closed for Syrian Kurds battling the Islamic State for Kobani. But if wounded in skirmishes and seeking medical help, Kurdish fighters told RT they are forced to smuggle themselves over the Turkish border to avoid arrest.

A Syrian Kurdish commander, who opted not to disclose his name, told RT’s Paula Slier that he was injured on the same day his son was killed.

But the man had no time to bury his boy, who fell next to him in battle. With a severe leg injury and rapid blood loss, he urgently needed to get himself to hospital.

The YPG (People’s Protection Units) commander said he had to lie to the Turkish army to let him cross the border and receive help because “if they’d known I was a fighter they’d have arrested me and not let me into Turkey.”

PaulaSlier_RT

The bloody siege of the Syrian town of Kobani, situated on the border with Turkey, by the Islamic State (IS, formerly known as ISIS) militants has been underway since mid-September.

The jihadists have recently intensified their shelling in the area, which led to numerous deaths and injuries among the Kurdish forces protecting it.

In such conditions, the wounded YPG troops are forced to smuggle themselves across the border for treatment in Turkey and then perform the same arduous journey back to join their brothers-in-arms.

“If the Turkish Army looked at my injuries closely, they’d have known I’m a fighter, but of course I said I was a civilian,” Bave Mazlum, Syrian Kurdish fighter, told RT.

Bave, who was treated for five days after being hit in the back, says he hopes to return to Kobani the same night after leaving hospital.

“We cross through the back paths illegally. God created us to die, so we are not afraid to die,” he explained.

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The Kobani siege has become a real headache for Ankara, with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan saying that the Syrian Kurds are as bad as the jihadists.

The YPG fighters in turn accuse the Turkish authorities of assisting and providing weapons to the IS.

“I saw myself how the Turkish army was helping ISIS. People in the Arab villages told us how they helped 150 fighters cross the border into Syria. The Turks gave them 35 tanks and 100 shelka weapons, rockets, that they used to attack us,” the YPG commander said.

On Monday, Ankara announced it will allow Kurds to cross its border into Kobani, but they were only talking about Iraqi Kurds, representing the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG).

Turkey has a difficult relationship with the 15 million Kurds living in the country and the representatives of the stateless ethnic group residing in neighboring Iraq and Syria.

Ankara views the Iraqi Kurds as an ally, but its attempts to reach peace with Turkish Kurds – through the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) – have failed, with the situation deteriorating over events in Kobani.

As for the Syrian Kurds – represented by the Syrian Kurdish PYD (Democratic Union Party) – the Turkish authorities demand they give up the idea of Kurdish autonomy and join the Syrian opposition in the battle against Ankara’s long-time foe, Syrian President Bashar Assad.

The Kurdish conflict with various jihadist groups taking part in the Syrian civil war, including the IS, started on July 2013 in the Syrian town of Ras al-Ayn.

Kurdish forces recently managed moderate military gains against the IS in northern Iraq, but the jihadists seem to be taking the upper hand in Syria.

Turkey has stationed tanks not far from Kobani as a precaution, but expressed no desire to join the battle against the Islamic State on the ground, drawing angry comments even from Washington.

It also sparked violent Kurdish riots in southeastern Turkey as protestors demanded Ankara at least open a land corridor for volunteer fighters and reinforcements.

…read more at: http://rt.com/news/198212-turkey-kurds-isis-kobani/

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